Subjects I teach

Programming undergraduate

My Experience

During my final year in high school, my school employed me to teach children from 5th to 10th grade, basic computer science. This was my first real teaching experience. At university, I again noticed my passion for teaching and started tutoring people from my own course in programming. Shortly after that, I started tutoring students, mostly undergraduates, from other courses and universities (UCL, Imperial) as well.

My Qualifications

When I was 12 years old I began to teach myself programming. After a few years, I started to work as a web developer, building websites and software for various companies in Germany. At some point I also started to freelance, offering web design and web development to anyone who needed it. After moving to London I continued my work as a developer at a tech startup. Here I was completely on my own, in a fast-paced high-pressure environment, and had to learn new techniques quickly and efficiently. When teaching I will put a lot of emphasis on teaching people actual real life principles, rather than simply repeating the things from the textbooks and lectures at school or university.

Aside from my work experience as a developer, I studied computer science for 2 years at high school in Germany. After finishing my studies there, I started studying Information Management at UCL. The degree is a mix of computer science and business studies.

Computer science / programming grades:
– Penultimate year at high school in Germany: 15/15
– Final year at high school in Germany: 15/15
– 1st year (undergrad) at University College London: 100%
– 2nd year (undergrad) at University College London: 98%

My Approach to Private Tuition

Learning by doing is essential when becoming a good programmer. When teaching I want to guide my student to the correct answer. I try to make the solution gradually more obvious, without actually saying it, and let them try what they think is best. This way, students have to engage and think themselves, instead of just getting the solution handed to them. An effective tutoring session should resemble a debate, a discussion between tutor and student. Saying things out loud and doing them, even if unsuccessful, is an important and integral part of learning.

My video Introduction


Fun fact

I can do a pull up with only one finger!